Natures in translation :romanticism and colonial naturalhistory

  • au: Alan Bewell.
  • Publish: Baltimore : Johns Hopkins Univ Press 2017.
  • 出版年: 2017
  • sb: History and criticism. , English literature 18th century -- History and criticism. , Natural history in literature. , Nature in literature. , English literature , Romanticism , Romanticism English-speaking countries. , English literature 19th century -- History and criticism.
  • ISBN: 142142097X , 9781421420974
  • ISSN: 9781421420974 , 142142097X
  • ps: Includes bibliographical references and index Introduction: natures in translation -- Erasmus Darwin's cosmopolitan nature -- Traveling natures -- Translating early Australian natural history -- An England of the mind: Gilbert White and the black-bobs of Selborne -- William Bartram's Travels and the contested natures of Southeast America -- "I see around me things which you cannot see": William Wordsworth and the historical ecology of human passion -- John Clare and the ghosts of natures past -- Ofweeds and men: evolution and the science of modern natures-- Frankenstein and the origin and extinction of species
  • ab: For many critics, Romanticism is synonymous with nature writing, for representations of the natural world appear during this period with a freshness, concreteness, depth, and intensity that have rarely been equaled. Why did nature matter so much to writers of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries? And how did it play such an important role in their understanding of themselves andthe world? In Natures in Translation, Alan Bewell argues that there is no Nature in the singular, only natures thathave undergone transformation through time and across space. He examines how writers-as disparate as Erasmus andCharles Darwin, Joseph Banks, Gilbert White, William Bartram, William Wordsworth, John Clare, and Mary Shelley-understood a world in which natures were traveling and resettling the globe like never before. Bewell presents British natural history as a translational activity aimed at globalizing local natures by making them mobile, exchangeable, comparable, and representable. Bewell explores how colonial writers, in the period leading up tothe formulation of evolutionary theory, responded to a world in which new natures were coming into being while others disappeared
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